All posts by John Held

Expressions of Interest for Builders: Copperhouse Court Redevelopment, Whyalla

  • Whyalla Aged Care Inc.: Copperhouse Court Redevelopment, Whyalla: Site Plan
  • Whyalla Aged Care Inc.: Copperhouse Court Redevelopment, Whyalla: View from Noble St
  • Whyalla Aged Care Inc.: Copperhouse Court Redevelopment, Whyalla: Aerial View from Hutchens St
  • Whyalla Aged Care Inc.: Copperhouse Court Redevelopment, Whyalla: new Memory Support Unit
  • Whyalla Aged Care Inc.: Copperhouse Court Redevelopment, Whyalla: new Memory Support Unit
  • Whyalla Aged Care Inc.: Copperhouse Court Redevelopment, Whyalla
  • Whyalla Aged Care Inc.: Copperhouse Court Redevelopment, Whyalla

Whyalla Aged Care Inc. operates aged facilities including Yeltana, Annie Lockwood and existing independent living units on their Newton Street Site, as well as Copperhouse Court, which is located at Flinders Aveune, Whyalla Stuart.

Whyalla Aged Care will call tenders in mid August this year  for a new 14 bed Memory Support Unit at Copperhouse Court, along with extensive refurbishment to the existing facility for a total project cost approaching $10m.

Expressions of interest are called from Licensed Builders wishing to tender for the project. Please provide business details, information on projects of similar type and size, current commitments and three referees from recent projects.

The EOI closes at noon on Wed 1st August at Russell & Yelland’s Office. Please provide electronic copies to jfheld@rusyel.com.au.  For further information contact John Held or Vouch Lim on 08 81728700.

Further Recognition for Concordia’s Nautilus Centre

  • Concordia College, Nautilus Centre - Fibonacci Lounge

    Photograph: David Sievers

  • Concordia College, Nautilus Centre - Lab display

    Photograph: David Sievers

  • Concordia College, Nautilus Centre - Foucault Pendulum Central Atrium

    Photograph: David Sievers

  • Concordia College, Nautilus Centre- view from quadrangle

    Photograph: David Sievers

  • Concordia College, Nautilus Centre - Sky Kaleidescope breakout

    Photograph: David Sievers

  • Concordia College, Nautilus Centre - Sky Kaleidescope

    Photograph: David Sievers

  • Concordia College, Nautilus Centre - Physics Area

    Photograph: David Sievers

  • Concordia College, Nautilus Centre- Solar System Breakout

    Photograph: David Sievers

  • Concordia College, Nautilus Centre- view from street

    Photograph: David Sievers

  • Concordia College, Nautilus Centre- Foucault Pendulum Central Atrium

    Photograph: David Sievers

Concordia’s Nautilus Centre was awarded a Commendation for Educational Buildings in the 2018 Australian Institute of Architects SA Chapter Awards.

The jury citation was as follows:

Possessing a restrained exterior, sympathetic to its surroundings, the Nautilus Centre pushes educational boundaries within and beyond its walls, creating a hub for all. The flexibility of the learning spaces form open yet secluded areas, linking learning theories and concepts to the overall design. The coherence of learning experience engages learners both passively and actively.

The building physically represents contemporary theory and heightens the learning experience by immersing students within a space embedded with concepts and theories. The success of the building is the calmness of abundant natural light and the transparency and visual engagement created by the floor planning.

The Nautilus cleverly opens up teaching and learning, securing a presence within the neighbourhood and ensuring that 21st century learning is on display.

Learning Environment Australasia awards Commendation to Concordia College’s Nautilus Centre

  • Concordia College, Nautilus Centre - Sky Kaleidescope breakout

    Photograph: David Sievers

  • Concordia College, Nautilus Centre - Sky Kaleidescope

    Photograph: David Sievers

  • Concordia College, Nautilus Centre - Physics Area

    Photograph: David Sievers

  • Concordia College, Nautilus Centre- Solar System Breakout

    Photograph: David Sievers

  • Concordia College, Nautilus Centre- view from street

    Photograph: David Sievers

  • Concordia College, Nautilus Centre - Foucault Pendulum Central Atrium

    Photograph: David Sievers

  • Concordia College, Nautilus Centre- Foucault Pendulum Central Atrium

    Photograph: David Sievers

  • Concordia College, Nautilus Centre- view from quadrangle

    Photograph: David Sievers

  • Concordia College, Nautilus Centre - Fibonacci Lounge

    Photograph: David Sievers

  • Concordia College, Nautilus Centre - Lab display

    Photograph: David Sievers

Russell & Yelland has been awarded a Commendation in the 2018 Australasian Region LEA Awards for Concordia’s Nautilus Centre in the category of new facilities under $8m.

The Jury commented as follows:

The Nautilus Centre, developed by Russell & Yelland Architects, has its foundation in a carefully considered educational brief. The resulting building is a thoughtful and carefully considered learning environment which exudes the celebration of science, bringing to life theory and practice through telling stories within the fabric of the building.

This is a learning environment that uses the whole building for learning from classroom spaces and labs through to shared space and even the stairwell that rotates around the Foucault pendulum. Breakout spaces and glass writing walls enable the student learning to – be mobile and adaptable.

As one student says: “The open learning spaces, filled with their uniquely textured details, creates a dynamic and flexible learning experience. The cleverly incorporated decorative features, which further arouse my scientific curiosity, is something which my friends all agree makes learning STEAM subjects more accessible.”

Visible learning is celebrated in the Nautilus Centre by bringing the class activity into the more public realms, using glazing and glass display boxes as walls and additional windows between teaching spaces. Deep transparency is achieved across the building creating a sense of lightness and openness, whilst retaining the ability to have individual learning spaces.

With a striking facade and a positive contribution to the campus setting, Russell & Yelland should be proud of creating an excellent new building for Concordia College that will inspire both the future generations of young scientists and the teachers that will utilise the Nautilus Centre.

More information on the awards is available here

Building Confidence: The Shergold-Weir Report and its Implications for Architects

The Shergold-Weir Report argues for better quality documentation and improved oversight. What do the recommendations mean for architects?

In mid-2017 the Building Ministers’ Forum (BMF) asked Professor Peter Shergold and Ms. Bronwyn Weir to undertake an assessment of the effectiveness of compliance and enforcement systems for the building and construction industry across Australia. The final report ‘Building Confidence’ was recently delivered to the BMF and is available for review here.

The stated goal of the report is to “enhance public trust through effective implementation of building and construction standards that protect the interests of those who own, work, live, or conduct their business in Australian buildings.” The report has a number of recommendations about the whole process of building and maintaining safe and well-constructed buildings, and has special significance in the wake of the Lacrosse and Grenfell Tower fires. It mainly deals with “commercial” rather than domestic scale buildings.

The report also has a number of observations and recommendations, which affect architects in our roles during design, construction and ongoing maintenance of buildings. If implemented it will change many aspects of the construction process, and in doing so it also presents a number of opportunities for architects to re-occupy areas of practice we have lost to other practitioners.

Building confidence and ensuring integrity

“The quality of buildings depends heavily on the competency and integrity of builders. There are many builders that have high standards of competency and integrity. However, the rates of disputes, alleged defects and reports of high levels of illegal phoenix activity are evidence that there are shortcomings in the performance of some builders. These need to be addressed.[p13]

Shergold and Weir are clear that there is insufficient supervision, auditing and expertise in the industry, and too many practitioners willing to take short cuts to save money and time. They also note that there are many conflicts of interest in the way compliance is achieved through private certifiers employed by the client or builder, and an unwillingness for certifiers or the approving authorities to enforce standards during construction. A number of recommendations address those conflicts by better documentation, registration of building practitioners, auditing of those practitioners, and inspections and checking during and after construction.

Registration of building practitioners

While there has been little progress on a true national scheme for registration of architects, our profession is often seen as a model for other building practitioners, where registration and licensing schemes vary widely between states and there is little appetite to harmonise systems or introduce mutual recognition across state borders. It also strongly endorses CPD (not yet a feature of all Architect’s Acts) and subcategories of registration for different building types – something which may be problematic for smaller architectural firms. It recommends strict controls on who can provide performance-based solutions under the NCC and when third-party certification of those solutions is required. Registered practitioners would also be required to have their work audited – so architects’ documentation for building rules consent could be audited by a third party. Building designers would also need to be registered – something which architects have long called for. It also calls for a consistent approach to the registration of builders, specialist subcontractors (especially fire contractors) and engineers.

Quality of documentation

There have been many reports over many years calling for better quality documentation by design professionals.  Shergold and Weir note:

“The adequacy of documentation prepared and approved as part of the building approvals process is often poor. The tendency for inadequate documentation to be prepared and accepted by building surveyors at the building approvals stage has increased, in part because of owners and developers endeavouring to minimise costs on documentation. This issue needs to be addressed as a matter of priority.

… Inadequate documentation can also result in hidden costs or allow builders to cut costs without owners being aware of it.

The integrity of documentation for future use is also compromised when the approval documents do not reflect the as-built building, or when they contain insufficient detail to properly inform building risk and maintenance requirements.” [p28]

Many of the problems noted are blamed on procurement methods, and in particular Design and Construct. The report notes often architects are not retained through the whole construction period.

“…architects and engineers have indicated that they may be engaged early in a project to prepare initial documentation but that their engagement then ends. Detailed construction documentation is prepared by others who may not possess the relevant skills. When products specified are substituted, architects, engineers and building surveyors may not be consulted.” [p31]

The report notes that the process for approving changes during construction is flawed, and that as-built documentation is either non-existent or of poor quality. It recommends that comprehensive digital manuals be required and that they should be stored centrally by government to allow access in the future by owners and maintainers of buildings.

Recommendation 16 of the report states that each jurisdiction should provide for a building compliance process that incorporates clear obligations for the approval of amended documentation by the appointed building surveyor throughout a project. It notes:

“Implementation of this recommendation will be challenging. It requires designers, building surveyors and builders to work to properly document design and construction specifications. This is the lynchpin of a best practice building approvals system and considerable effort will be required to effectively bring about systemic change in this area.” [p32]

Shergold and Weir envisage a very different system to that currently in place – but one that ensures the safety and amenity of the users of our buildings.

What does it mean for architects?

Architects must firstly take responsibility for, and publicly commit to, a better quality of documentation. The skill set for producing such documentation has reduced over the past generation, and the downward pressure on fees has seen it lost as a core business of many architectural firms. It is not seen as glamorous, award-winning or valued by clients, builders or end users. Endless reports on the value of good documentation go ignored, especially when fees and scope are negotiated. Footage of the Grenfell and Lacrosse fires should have awakened a new desire by architects to argue for good documentation, procurement and construction practice.

Our profession already has registration and a relatively good system for dealing with complaints from the public – but does it actually want to fight for a role as a leader in construction industry for integrity, competence and high levels of technical skill? Will we welcome the idea of auditing of our work and accepting criticism of poor documentation without blaming clients, builders and fees? These are moral, not just business choices, and lives depend on it.

Judging by past efforts to achieve any national improvement in the construction industry, the three tiers of our wonderful federated system of government will conspire to stuff it up. As architects, we owe it to the public to advocate for a better, safer and more trustworthy industry.  We need all architects to step up alongside us. You’d better start writing to politicians today if you want that vision for the future.

This article was first published on the Association of Consulting Architects Website

News from Russell & Yelland

As we start 2018  we are thankful for the past year working on a number of interesting projects, and significant additions to the wider Russell & Yelland “family”.
Construction is about to commence on the new Caritas Building at Nazareth Catholic College, our third major project on the Flinders Park site. In October the Nautilus Centre was opened at Concordia College, which combines Science, Art, Maths and other STEM subjects in a new two-storey complex which has already won an Award of Excellence in the IESANZ SA/NT lighting awards. A number of our government STEM projects have now been completed and the remainder are in construction. We completed a number of school Master Plans, and are currently designing a range of new Aged Care projects for Whyalla Aged Care. St Josephs Boarding House in Pt Lincoln was completed within the tight deadlines ready for the new school year. A new music centre for Cabra College is scheduled to start construction in the new year, and we are undertaking a number of projects in regional hospitals. The new Galilee Administration building also won a commendation in the LEA SA Regional Awards.
We welcomed Scott Murdoch to our staff in March, and Jessica Weiland, who had worked with us whilst studying, to full-time employment in November. Vouch returned from maternity leave in January, and Lauren Knight started her maternity leave in May – she’s back one day a week now but 3-4 days a week next year.
Our yearly cooking event, “Vouch’s Kitchen”,  was supposed to be a housewarming for Stewart and Mia– except the host family was absent for the entire event, spending the evening in Casualty with a daughter suffering trampoline injuries. As well as regular Whyalla visits this year, Heather hosted the Parlour Instagram account for a week. Parlour is a group dedicated to gender equity in architecture, and our staff’s contribution was well received. Hariklia’s post on site etiquette was also chosen for a pop-up exhibition on women in architecture in Melbourne.Scott, Rhiana and Anthea got to throw their hats in the air when graduating from the University of Adelaide in April this year. The next big hurdle will be Registration as Architects in a few years time!

 

We seem to have been inundated with babies this year! Lauren and David’s daughter Tessa was born in June; Lindsay and Dan’s Miranda in September; Craig and Pippa’s son Reuben and Will and Kimberley’s son Hugh in September! In addition Alistair and John became grandfathers again.

Michelle took on a huge workload this year as we rolled out new practice management systems. She is dreaming about the new caravan and the chance to visit the Kimberleys mid next year.

As is usual, we have made a donation to the Australian Refugee Association in lieu of sending cards.
Our office will be closed from noon on Friday 22nd  December and will reopen on Monday  8th  January. You can text or call John Held on 0417 840 337 during the break if required.

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Concordia Nautilus Centre wins IESANZ SA/NT lighting Award of Excellence

  • Concordia Nautilus Centre - upper breakout zone
  • Concordia Nautilus Centre
  • Concordia Nautilus Centre
  • Concordia Nautilus Centre - stairwell
  • Concordia Nautilus Centre

This project recently won an IESANZ SA/NT lighting Award of Excellence.

The judges stated:
“It was evident from the street as soon as we arrived at the site that this was going to be something special. An excellent example of project coordination between all design partners – architect, interior designer, engineer, lighting designer and client. The integration of architecture and lighting is exceptional. The attention to detail by all involved (including the electrical contractor is first-rate. All involved in this project should be commended on an excellent result.”

Project Architects: Emily Chalk & Craig Buckberry, Russell & Yelland
Lighting Designers: Robert Bartosik & Anthony Davidson, Secon Consulting Engineers

Galilee Catholic School Administration Centre receives Award

  • Galilee Catholic School Administration Building
  • Galilee Catholic School Reception Area
  • Galilee Catholic School Staff Room
  • Galilee Catholic School Reception Area

The new Administration Building at Galilee Catholic School at Aldinga received a Commendation in the recent inaugural Learning Environments Australasia SA Regional Awards.

The Building includes reception, staff, parish and community facilities.

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Step up, don’t step back…

Is stepping up to the small stuff also the path to improving the profession’s wider role in society?

In recent weeks I’ve heard some horror stories of projects going wrong. I don’t know all the details (and thankfully they are not our own projects) but there seems to be a common thread in many of them of architects simply not stepping up.

At the same time I’ve been reading about the architect’s role in society. Indy Johar, for example, states that for architects to have relevance “we must realign to focus  on all citizens and all their needs; not the construction and real estate industry  who are only a means for making our environment”.  He talks about both social and spatial justice to allow all citizens to flourish.

How are these connected? Is it because, in both cases, architects don’t step up?

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Research in Practice

John Held reflects on conjunctions of research and practice in a talk presented at the Australian Institute of Architects Flipped Forum, which asked ‘Can practice lead research?’

What does it mean to ‘flip’? In the strict pedagogical definition, it denotes swapping the roles of classroom and homework – reviewing and gathering content out of session, and using face-to-face time for discussion and exploration of the topic. But in the context of this discussion more likely it refers to the idea of practice-led or practice-based research. What forms could that take?

I have a bit of a problem with the definition of ‘practice’ as an activity divorced from academia, and the related idea of practice being just about business, profitability and technical capability.

How not to do it

Our firm was approached by a university a few years ago for seed funding for an interesting project related to sustainability. We considered it carefully but they didn’t want us involved in the research – ‘please hand us your money and we’ll give you a report at the end’. Any chance of learning went out the window, as did we.

How it informs design

If you are to be good at what you do, you have to keep up with research. If you are going to be involved in design for education, know what the research is saying.

As an example, the research of Carla Rinaldi and her influence on early childhood education in South Australia continues as architects participate in joint research on pedagogy and architecture as part of the South Australian Collaborative Childhood Project.

Keeping abreast of research on environments for aged people with memory loss is critical if your buildings are going to be calmer, happier places in which to live.

Our work with Guida Moseley Brown on Mawson Institute Building V was informed by research on research – the concept of placing disparate science and engineering disciplines together; with offices and labs directly connected, and making those researchers bump into each other and help solve each other’s problems.

So perhaps the concept of practitioners and researchers ‘bumping into each other’ is an inspiration for how we should approach practice and research.

How does it happen in practices?

In the midst of project deadlines and dramas and worrying about not having enough work or too much work, the importance of both reflective practice and internal research is really important.

Access to your own data for decision-making doesn’t sound like high-end research, but it’s surprising the stories you hear of architects who have no idea about the detail of their own practices.

In our case, as an example, we’ve spent a great deal of time and reflection on how to change workflows, project processes and outputs to suit truly collaborative BIM workflows.

It may not sound grand but it involves the same methodologies as academic research. We are also researching ways of integrating Virtual Reality into those workflows – not just for clients, but as part of our design review processes.

Finally, we realise the important links between the universities and practice, which is why we have three of our staff teaching and always have students working for us to keep those links alive.

Few small practices have the resources to fund academic research – but as a profession we should be doing this.

How does it happen as a profession?

We really dropped the ball in the last 15 years as a profession in terms of research about architects.  There’s been no significant work done on the effect of documentation quality on construction costs for 17 years. It’s even longer since the CSIRO did research on fees.

We don’t know how many architects there are in Australia, how many work in alternative roles, what happens to graduates after university, and why starting salaries are below most other professions.

Susan Shannon’s work was the first I’d seen tracking graduates – and should be the basis of a much bigger longitudinal survey over many years to get a better understanding of what we actually do as architects – and as graduates who don’t get registered but do other equally important things.

The Parlour survey was the first time we’d seen the scope of the many different ways you can practice architecture.

Locally, the SA State of the Profession survey highlighted a number of issues that need to be addressed – pay, gender equity, career paths, the unexplained dropout of mid-career architects and, most importantly, the future of the profession. But tellingly, we couldn’t get the required outcomes from universities – at least not for the budget we had available.  We ended up going to people who bridge academia and other non-traditional forms or practice – in this case, Justine Clark and Gillian Matthewson.  And trying to get a national version of the survey up finding the funding is proving very difficult.

The spinoff – a great series of reflective pieces under the theme “Where to From Here” – again highlight a diversity of practice and a belief in the future of our profession.

Our next try at research is to get access to the large amounts of data held by government clients – in this case DPTI – to actually find out relationships between fees, hours, and building outcomes.

How does it happen as a policy instrument?

If you are going to lobby on behalf of architects to government or clients you had better have some facts to back it up – even in this world of alternative facts.

You want to change the type of procurement? Here’s some facts about what happens when you do.

Want us to work for free?  Here’s some facts about what happens when you do.

Want to cut our fees again?  Here’s some facts about what happens when you do.

Want to push us downstream, rather than as a trusted advisor?  Here’s the evidence.

But it’s hard to find good evidence, because the research isn’t there.

We don’t have a group whose sole purpose is to produce solid research: even if the answers are not quite what you hoped.

How does it happen as an industry?

It doesn’t – at least not enough. The lack of investment in R&D in the industry is well known, and because so much of it is fragmented and comprised of very small organisations it’s not likely to improve without external funding sources.

This is too big a topic for today – suffice to say that if architects don’t help lead the push for more research, other groups will, to our detriment.

Conclusion

Firstly, we need to see practice and academia as a continuum, as opposed to polar opposites, because that is how it is in the real world. At the same time, we need to understand who is doing the big picture thinking about the future of practice.  This can only happen if you treat “practice” (in all its forms) as a subject worthy of academic discourse and research.

Our main task, therefore, is to strengthen links between academia and practice – and understand that all the different and alternative futures of the profession are reliant on this.

2016 – the year in review

ry2016

2016 has been a good year for Russell & Yelland. Significant projects included the new Science and Administration facilities under construction at Concordia College, with the administration building and the St. Johns Canopy complete; work commencing on the new Caritas Building at Nazareth Catholic College, Flinders Park, and the Boarding House at St Josephs School Port Lincoln nearing completion. We undertook a number of projects in Whyalla, including completion of the Cedar Wing at Yeltana Nursing Home, a major feasibility study for future secondary schooling in Whyalla (in association with Phillips Pilkington Architects), and planning studies for STEM facilities for four Whyalla primary schools. We are working on another three of these STEM projects, with the Minister for Education, Dr Susan Close, celebrating the commencement of construction of the Brompton Primary project with a Virtual Reality tour of the new facility. This VR technology is changing the way we can experience design – we are very excited about future opportunities in this area!Other projects included completion of school projects at Galilee and St John Bosco Catholic schools; a number of projects in country hospitals including a new renal & dialysis facility at the Gawler Hospital, and a large number of public housing schemes. The new Renown Park Preschool is under construction, and we undertook master planning for Nazareth and Woodcroft College campuses. Our UniSA Mt. Gambier Learning Centre (in association with GMB Architects) won awards from Learning Environments Australasia and the MBA.

In June we farewelled Alex Clothier, who has moved to Sydney, and Dan Schumann who returned to Flightpath Architects.  We welcomed Rhiana Bell and Anthea Marshall in November following their graduation from Adelaide University – both have previously worked with us as students. We also have Jess Weiland, a fourth year student, working with us at present.

We’ve also welcomed Tara, a daughter to Jeremy and Vouch, and Connor, a son for Stewart and Mia. We’ve kept our cooking skills sharp with a “how to make gnocchi” night at Craig’s house. Alistair and Stewart are both still building their houses, Craig and Pippa bought a barn in Mt Barker and Will and Kim a renovator’s special– whilst John’s happy for a couple of weeks overseas in January instead.

As is usual, we have made a donation to the Australian Refugee Association in lieu of sending cards.
Our office will be closed from noon on Thursday 22nd  December and will reopen on Monday  9th  January. You can contact John Held on 0417 840 337 until the 3rd January and Craig  Buckberry on 0401 393 706 for the remainder of the break if required.

We’d like to thank our team, clients, and colleagues for the opportunity to make great places and we wish you all a blessed Christmas and a Happy New Year!