All posts by Stewart Caldwell

John Held Awarded Presidents Medal

At this years South Australian Institute of Architects Awards, Director of Russell and Yelland Architects John Held was awarded the 2017 Sir James Irwin President’s Medal.
The Sir James Irwin President’s Medal is the highest accolade offered by the Australian Institute of Architects within South Australia.
When delivering the award current SA chapter president Mario Dreosti’s noted John’s contribution to industry “which has demonstrated core professional values of innovation in technologies, collaboration in our thinking, and in a willingness to lead and deliver vast amounts of voluntary contribution to the benefit of our whole industry”
The Sir James Irwin President’s Medal is awarded each year to a member or industry collaborative considered by the President to have made a significant contribution to architecture. It was established in 1992 through the generosity of the Irwin family in memory and in recognition of the services to architecture of Sir James Irwin. Previous recipients include Francesco Bonato, John Morhphett AM, OBE, LFRAI, John Schenk LFRAIA, Susan Phillips and Michael Pilkington.
A copy of the full citation can be found here

Brompton Primary School STEM

In July 2016 the SA Government announced a stimulus package for the creation of Science, Technology, Engineering and Maths (STEM) facilities in 139 public schools across South Australia.

Construction of the Brompton Primary School STEM project commenced in December 2016 with a site visit from the Minister for Education and Child Development, the Hon. Susan Close. It will be one of the first of the STEM Works projects to be completed.

The design aims to encourage hands-on making and open-ended creative investigations.The robust finishes and open-plan workshop feel will show that the space is not ‘precious’ – it’s there to be used and it’s okay to make a mess!

The children will be the ‘star of the show’, with many locations for displaying and celebrating their work. Almost every surface will be interactive, including the ceiling, which is designed for hanging things from. Wall surfaces will used for display, storage, creation and collaboration, via a lego wall, pegboards, slat wall and whiteboards.

The four zones in the STEM space are denoted by different flooring, but are all interconnected, allowing multiple patterns of use. The dark room space is more formal, used for presentations, demonstrations, green-screen work and light experiments. The timber structure around the dark room is designed to with exposed connections to show how it was assembled.

The STEM space will connect to the courtyard and the veggie garden, as well as into the classrooms to the north. STEM will not be a ‘special’ activity but a normal part of the school day, easily accessible and highly visible.

To visualise this project in 3D, click on the image below to jump into a panoramic 3D representation. Each label will take you to a different view.

 

If you have a smartphone and want a more immersive experience you can equip yourself with a viewer such as the google cardboard and rotate your phone to have the views formatted in stereoscopic.
Minister for Education, Dr. Susan Close, takes a virtual tour through Brompton Primary's new STEM facility
Minister for Education, Dr. Susan Close, takes a virtual tour through Brompton Primary’s new STEM facility

 

Brompton Primary School's Principal, Tina Treffers, with the Minister for Education, Dr. Susan Close, and students
Brompton Primary School’s Principal, Tina Treffers, with the Minister for Education, Dr. Susan Close, and students

 

Brompton Primary School - the "darkroom"
Brompton Primary School – the dark room

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Money for nothing…..

What would you pay for information? It isn’t a tangible object, you can’t hold it, sometimes you can’t even use it, but people pay for it all the time. In the gaming community alone in 2011 $3.7 billion was spent on virtual items -intangible objects which only exist virtually in an artificial environment. How can these items have this kind of value?

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Where is the value in BIM?

There is a great deal of commentary about the apparent value of Building Information Modelling (BIM). Much discussion revolves around costs associated technology, hardware, licensing, and how this cost is recovered. Are these costs the real impact on value?

To address this question I want to talk about bike helmets.

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How teaching can influence the built environment.

A few years ago I was involved in a research program for young professionals facilitated by CEFPI (Council of Educational Facility Planners International) called the Mayfield Project. Our submission consisted of a number of case studies which explored the relationship between pedagogy and the built environment. I examined a recently completed open plan science lab building. The process had a huge influence on my professional development and the results changed the way I viewed educational design, they are summarised below:

A teachers classroom is like their home, it needs to be secure, provide privacy while being adaptable with good links to a range of spaces. Multi purpose or flexible spaces run the risk of becoming homeless. Openness and transparency can come at the expense of privacy and security. This Science Centre designed as open plan for accessibility attempts to find a middle ground.

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Building Information Modelling: How is it changing Architecture?

BIM10
Samaritan College, Whyalla: Xavier Wing
Building Information Modelling (BIM) is changing the practice of architecture, and its impact is beginning to revolutionise the industry.

The digital age brought with it the birth of CAD (computer aided design), the information age has evolved CAD into BIM. So what is BIM? How does one model ‘information’ and how does this have anything to do with architecture? These questions are hotly debated by many who claim to be “experts”.

Perhaps it is better to start by discussing what BIM is not. To dispel some of the myths lets briefly discuss some common misconceptions:

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