Tag Archives: Science Technology Engineering Mathematics

Learning Environment Australasia awards Commendation to Concordia College’s Nautilus Centre

  • Concordia College, Nautilus Centre- Foucault Pendulum Central Atrium

    Photograph: David Sievers

  • Concordia College, Nautilus Centre - Foucault Pendulum Central Atrium

    Photograph: David Sievers

  • Concordia College, Nautilus Centre - Physics Area

    Photograph: David Sievers

  • Concordia College, Nautilus Centre- view from quadrangle

    Photograph: David Sievers

  • Concordia College, Nautilus Centre - Fibonacci Lounge

    Photograph: David Sievers

  • Concordia College, Nautilus Centre- Solar System Breakout

    Photograph: David Sievers

  • Concordia College, Nautilus Centre - Sky Kaleidescope breakout

    Photograph: David Sievers

  • Concordia College, Nautilus Centre - Lab display

    Photograph: David Sievers

  • Concordia College, Nautilus Centre- view from street

    Photograph: David Sievers

  • Concordia College, Nautilus Centre - Sky Kaleidescope

    Photograph: David Sievers

Russell & Yelland has been awarded a Commendation in the 2018 Australasian Region LEA Awards for Concordia’s Nautilus Centre in the category of new facilities under $8m.

The Jury commented as follows:

The Nautilus Centre, developed by Russell & Yelland Architects, has its foundation in a carefully considered educational brief. The resulting building is a thoughtful and carefully considered learning environment which exudes the celebration of science, bringing to life theory and practice through telling stories within the fabric of the building.

This is a learning environment that uses the whole building for learning from classroom spaces and labs through to shared space and even the stairwell that rotates around the Foucault pendulum. Breakout spaces and glass writing walls enable the student learning to – be mobile and adaptable.

As one student says: “The open learning spaces, filled with their uniquely textured details, creates a dynamic and flexible learning experience. The cleverly incorporated decorative features, which further arouse my scientific curiosity, is something which my friends all agree makes learning STEAM subjects more accessible.”

Visible learning is celebrated in the Nautilus Centre by bringing the class activity into the more public realms, using glazing and glass display boxes as walls and additional windows between teaching spaces. Deep transparency is achieved across the building creating a sense of lightness and openness, whilst retaining the ability to have individual learning spaces.

With a striking facade and a positive contribution to the campus setting, Russell & Yelland should be proud of creating an excellent new building for Concordia College that will inspire both the future generations of young scientists and the teachers that will utilise the Nautilus Centre.

More information on the awards is available here

Concordia Nautilus Centre wins IESANZ SA/NT lighting Award of Excellence

  • Concordia Nautilus Centre
  • Concordia Nautilus Centre - stairwell
  • Concordia Nautilus Centre
  • Concordia Nautilus Centre - upper breakout zone
  • Concordia Nautilus Centre

This project recently won an IESANZ SA/NT lighting Award of Excellence.

The judges stated:
“It was evident from the street as soon as we arrived at the site that this was going to be something special. An excellent example of project coordination between all design partners – architect, interior designer, engineer, lighting designer and client. The integration of architecture and lighting is exceptional. The attention to detail by all involved (including the electrical contractor is first-rate. All involved in this project should be commended on an excellent result.”

Project Architects: Emily Chalk & Craig Buckberry, Russell & Yelland
Lighting Designers: Robert Bartosik & Anthony Davidson, Secon Consulting Engineers

Brompton Primary School STEM

In July 2016 the SA Government announced a stimulus package for the creation of Science, Technology, Engineering and Maths (STEM) facilities in 139 public schools across South Australia.

Construction of the Brompton Primary School STEM project commenced in December 2016 with a site visit from the Minister for Education and Child Development, the Hon. Susan Close. It will be one of the first of the STEM Works projects to be completed.

The design aims to encourage hands-on making and open-ended creative investigations.The robust finishes and open-plan workshop feel will show that the space is not ‘precious’ – it’s there to be used and it’s okay to make a mess!

The children will be the ‘star of the show’, with many locations for displaying and celebrating their work. Almost every surface will be interactive, including the ceiling, which is designed for hanging things from. Wall surfaces will used for display, storage, creation and collaboration, via a lego wall, pegboards, slat wall and whiteboards.

The four zones in the STEM space are denoted by different flooring, but are all interconnected, allowing multiple patterns of use. The dark room space is more formal, used for presentations, demonstrations, green-screen work and light experiments. The timber structure around the dark room is designed to with exposed connections to show how it was assembled.

The STEM space will connect to the courtyard and the veggie garden, as well as into the classrooms to the north. STEM will not be a ‘special’ activity but a normal part of the school day, easily accessible and highly visible.

To visualise this project in 3D, click on the image below to jump into a panoramic 3D representation. Each label will take you to a different view.

 

If you have a smartphone and want a more immersive experience you can equip yourself with a viewer such as the google cardboard and rotate your phone to have the views formatted in stereoscopic.
Minister for Education, Dr. Susan Close, takes a virtual tour through Brompton Primary's new STEM facility
Minister for Education, Dr. Susan Close, takes a virtual tour through Brompton Primary’s new STEM facility

 

Brompton Primary School's Principal, Tina Treffers, with the Minister for Education, Dr. Susan Close, and students
Brompton Primary School’s Principal, Tina Treffers, with the Minister for Education, Dr. Susan Close, and students

 

Brompton Primary School - the "darkroom"
Brompton Primary School – the dark room

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Designing Schools for STEM

Is school design for STEM about encouraging chance encounters across subject areas?

The recent announcement by the SA Government of a $250m stimulus package to provide Science, Technology, Engineering & Maths (STEM) facilities for government schools has prompted the question: what does designing for STEM look like?

There are many articles noting how STEM skills are vital to the future of Australia; concerns about low numbers of science and mathematics graduates; and much talk about innovation. When it comes to design of spaces for STEM in schools, the principles seem to be the same as for most other disciplines: flexible, adaptable and interconnected environments which encourage a range of learning styles and cater for different group sizes and activities. We have seen the introduction of the Maker movement into schools, with laser cutters and 3D printers now common, and the rise of all things digital.

UniSA College: Science & Maths Centre, Mawson Lakes Photograph: Michael Bodroghy

UniSA College: Science & Maths Centre, Mawson Lakes  Photographer: Michael Bodroghy

 

When planning the UniSA College Centre for Science and Maths at Mawson Lakes, we emphasized a range of table, seating and display possibilities with less emphasis on traditional lab experiments and more on space for 3D printers and scanners. The structure of the existing building only allowed us to create very small display windows facing circulation areas – but this became an advantage as it gives a museum-like prestige to the objects on display. The building fabric also tells a story – the recycled timber ceiling screen is a graph of global warming. Continue reading